45 minutes ago on April 23, 2014

thehowlingwolf:

i-come-by-it-honestly:

John Scalzi gets it.

JFC YES!




2 hours ago on April 23, 2014
pickpants-maemae:

Guys this picture is so important to me. Sometimes i back out of cosplaying a character because im worried people will judge me or shame me for doing it because im black. Im constantly worried people wont take my cosplays seriously because im just a black girl dressing up as iconic white characters. And sometimes that fear makes me feel like I shouldnt do it, like cosplaying isnt for me and I shouldnt go to cons.
But meeting this little girl made me understand how important it is to show my love for characters even if they arent my race. This little girl came up to me and asked for a picture at LexCon, and I almost cried. She came up to me the ONLY black Harley in a sea of perfectly “accurate” white Harleys. And I was so happy she did, and so happy I was there. Im glad I chose to cosplay a character I love, and to be there representing black cosplayers, because now this little girl might have a little bit more confidence in herself. Maybe my being there helped this little girl see that even girls like her can be geeky and cosplay whoever they want.
I really hope so. I know this made me feel more confident. And this is a picture im gonna treasure forever!

pickpants-maemae:

Guys this picture is so important to me. Sometimes i back out of cosplaying a character because im worried people will judge me or shame me for doing it because im black. Im constantly worried people wont take my cosplays seriously because im just a black girl dressing up as iconic white characters. And sometimes that fear makes me feel like I shouldnt do it, like cosplaying isnt for me and I shouldnt go to cons.

But meeting this little girl made me understand how important it is to show my love for characters even if they arent my race. This little girl came up to me and asked for a picture at LexCon, and I almost cried. She came up to me the ONLY black Harley in a sea of perfectly “accurate” white Harleys. And I was so happy she did, and so happy I was there. Im glad I chose to cosplay a character I love, and to be there representing black cosplayers, because now this little girl might have a little bit more confidence in herself. Maybe my being there helped this little girl see that even girls like her can be geeky and cosplay whoever they want.

I really hope so. I know this made me feel more confident. And this is a picture im gonna treasure forever!




2 hours ago on April 23, 2014
autumnyte:

collapsed:

my hero

I was worried that the cleaner might have lost her job over this, but apparently the company that employs her stood up for her and said she was just doing her job. 
Now I can comfortably lol. 

autumnyte:

collapsed:

my hero

I was worried that the cleaner might have lost her job over this, but apparently the company that employs her stood up for her and said she was just doing her job. 

Now I can comfortably lol. 




2 hours ago on April 23, 2014
martymuses:

It’s April 23rd…. you know what that means. 

martymuses:

It’s April 23rd…. you know what that means. 




3 hours ago on April 23, 2014
siriussandra said: "I'm considering writing a novel of a female Robin Hood, and was wondering if it could be historically accurate to write her as being half-Asian? The story would take place in the 12th century in England. Do you have any information on Asian people living in England at that time?"

medievalpoc:

medievalpoc:

Of course. Asia and Europe aren’t even a separate landmass, after all.

Here are some links to give you a broader perspective on the kinds of people who would have been in Medieval England, Europe overall, how and why they got there, and how long they would have been there for.

The Silk Road

The Silk Road (Europe-Asia) in Antiquity

The Silk Road (Europe-Asia) via Ottoman Turkey

Pilgrimage and Traditions of Travel

Mongolian Empire

Ottoman Empire

Western Europe via Venice (trade gateway)

Black and Asian Performance in British History (V&A Museum)

Description of Rome from Ancient China

Quick Primer on Medieval Multiculturalism/Medieval Islam

Prehistoric Silk Road: The Steppe Road

tagged: Crusades

 China

 Japan

 India

 Mongolia

P.S. Asian people in Medieval European art are usually “marked” that way via clothing, not physical characteristics.

P.P.S. There’s a good bit of evidence that a character like the one you describe would not have necessarily been perceived as physically “other” or “different” by Medieval English society; but you’re writing for people reading this story now. Probably keep that in mind.

Also, an Asian woman as a Robin Hood type character would make a fascinating story and a lot of sense! Many Asian nations/regions have a long tradition of women warriors.

One more fun thing: Trotula of Salerno, who revolutionized Medieval medicine by and for women, synthesizing knowledge flowing out of Asia and the Middle East regarding medicine and specifically gynecology. In Medieval Europe, some of the most well-known people of color were physicians, because African and Asian medicine was pretty revered.

It all depends on what kind of story you want to tell. You can have some pretty epic Merry Men and Women, too!




12 hours ago on April 23, 2014

naamahdarling:

raisesomehale:

inquiringcharlie:

there is only two people on this earth that make those moves work for them

Beyonce

this guy

image

HOLY SHIT.

No, I don’t care if you’re a straight dude or this isn’t your kind of music, watch this and educate yourself about why (boys) dancing is so fucking amazing.

do you think this was choreographed? or do you think it was all improv? DAMN. that’s hot.




12 hours ago on April 23, 2014

bblackgoldd:

lafaceoaklandbooty:

The Dapper Rebels of Los Angeles, 1966

lawd




12 hours ago on April 23, 2014

beckett-flavored:

i feel like Leverage is the most underrated show on this whole site




12 hours ago on April 23, 2014

inabasket:

cool it comes with a free refill 




12 hours ago on April 23, 2014

10 Poverty Myths, Busted | Mother Jones 

gailsimone:

america-wakiewakie:

1. Single moms are the problem. Only 9 percent of low-income, urban moms have been single throughout their child’s first five years. Thirty-five percent were married to, or in a relationship with, the child’s father for that entire time.

2. Absent dads are the problem. Sixty percent of low-income dads see at least one of their children daily. Another 16 percent see their children weekly.

3. Black dads are the problem. Among men who don’t live with their children, black fathers are more likely than white or Hispanic dads to have a daily presence in their kids’ lives.

4. Poor people are lazy. In 2004, there was at least one adult with a job in 60 percent of families on food stamps that had both kids and a nondisabled, working-age adult.

5. If you’re not officially poor, you’re doing okay. The federal poverty line for a family of two parents and two children in 2012 was $23,283. Basic needs cost at least twice that in 615 of America’s cities and regions.

6. Go to college, get out of poverty. In 2012, about 1.1 million people who made less than $25,000 a year, worked full time, and were heads of household had a bachelor’s degree.

7. We’re winning the war on poverty. The number of households with children living on less than $2 a day per person has grown 160 percent since 1996, to 1.65 million families in 2011.

8. The days of old ladies eating cat food are over. The share of elderly single women living in extreme poverty jumped 31 percent from 2011 to 2012.

9. The homeless are drunk street people. One in 45 kids in the United States experiences homelessness each year. In New York City alone, 22,000 children are homeless.

10. Handouts are bankrupting us. In 2012, total welfare funding was 0.47 percent of the federal budget.

Reblog a thousand times.

I have been poor. I have lived in serious poverty. 

I worked as hard then as I do now, and I work very hard indeed, as did almost everyone else I knew who was poor, regardless of background, ethnicity, or marriage status. 

We all know these things the wealthy and entitled say are lies…why do we allow that to continue to be the narrative?